Wild South East

a nature blog of south-east Victoria, mostly Gippsland

Croajingolong

Leave a comment


Last fortnight we spent three days in Croajingolong National Park in far SE Gippsland. It’s been about 12 years since we were last here and it was good to see it hasn’t changed a bit. This remote national park is reasonably pristine and contains vast tracts of forest and coastline stretching about 100kms from the Vic/NSW border west to Bemm River. We camped at Thurra River which is full of shady campsites and is several kilometres from the Point Hicks Lighthouse.

One of the highlights included walking on (and sliding down) the enormous sand dunes a couple of kilometres from camp.

Thurra River sand dunes

Thurra River sand dunes

20151009_164124[1]

View from dunes toward the mouth of the Thurra River and camp.

20151009_170841[1]

A track leads around the back and on top of these dunes and when I first visited this place years ago the river could easily be followed from the base of the dunes back to camp. Not so this time. The river and banks were choked with debris and it took us over two hours to reach camp. Our girls slept well that night!

Lace Monitor tracks

Tracks of a Lace Monitor

Another highlight was seeing a single Hooded Plover at the mouth of the Thurra River. It didn’t seem to be nesting yet but a Pied Oystercatcher was and seemed to be getting annoyed at the plover for getting close to it’s nest and chased it several times. The oystercatcher’s apparent mate was nearby and was banded with an orange tag and number 18 on it.

Hooded Plover

Hooded Plover

P1100762

Pied Oystercatcher on nest

Pied Oystercatcher on nest

P1100756

Also at the mouth was a Caspian Tern. This species, along with the Hooded Plover, is listed as threatened under the FFG Act.

Caspian Tern

Caspian Tern

While at walking back to camp one morning I noticed a Grey Currawong acting nervous and swooping on something in our camp. It turned out to be one of the biggest, fattest Tiger Snakes I’ve ever seen and was quite aggressive when I tried to make it leave our campsite.

Tiger Snake

Tiger Snake

A few Red-bellied Black Snakes were seen during our stay as well, luckily not in our camp!

We made the 2km walk to the Point Hicks Lighthouse and went on a very interesting tour of it. The construction of it and the adjoining cottages began in 1887 and took three years to complete.  The cottages were initially to be built of granite but a ship was wrecked nearby loaded with timber and other building supplies bound for elsewhere so this was instead used. Talk about luck! The 37m tall lighthouse was initially to be built from granite blocks quarried and cut from site but instead this granite was crushed and used to concrete it. Imagine the effort in hauling up the wet concrete day after day. The only day they got off was on Christmas day but they got double their rum rations. Slackers.

Point Hicks Lighthouse and caretaker cottages

Point Hicks Lighthouse and caretaker cottages

On April 20th 1770 James Cook sailing on the Endeavour passed Point Hicks and was the first European to sight the east coast of Australia. He named the point after Lieutenant Zachary Hicks who was the first to sight land.

James Cook Memorial

Memorial to Cook and Hicks.

Swathes of

Coastal vegetation at Point Hicks

While at the top of the lighthouse we spotted these Australian Fur-seals basking on rocks at the point. There was a large male with a female and juveniles and they weren’t too worried when we went down and got a closer look.

Australian Fur-seals basking

Australian Fur-seals basking

Dreaming of fish

Dreaming of fish

The plant life surrounding Thurra River and Point Hicks was amazing and much of it was familiar to me but many weren’t. It was good to see Sweet Pittosporum Pittosporum undulatum in it’s correct habitat and not a serious environmental weed as in western Gippsland.

Stinging Nettle in full flower

Stinging Nettle in full flower

Native Violet Viola hederacea

Native Violet Viola hederacea

Pigface

Pigface Carpobrotus sp

Dianella tasmanica

Dianella tasmanica

 

Caladenia orchid

Caladenia orchid

Bidgee Widgee Acaena novae-zealandiae

Bidgee Widgee Acaena novae-zealandiae

.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s